Aquaponics 101 – Hatching Tilapia

My first batch of Tilapia babies (they were named batch # 08/10A) have grown like crazy and have become totally conditioned to feeding times. I am using normal Tilapia Starter food from AquaNutro and merely crush the pellets into a powder and then feed them to the fish.

I have had limited success collecting random eggs from the brood tank and hatching them in my home-made incubator so the events of yesterday really put my incubator to the test. In moving some fish around yesterday a female coughed up literally a thousand eggs and very small fry with egg sacs still attached. We quickly went into action and moved batch# 08/10A into a newly prepared mesh pond where they will grow for a few weeks before being moved out to one of the farms.

We then carefully netted off the new batch #08/11A and put them into the fry tank. The eggs I placed into the incubator and was surprised to find them all hatched out overnight. Temperatures in the fry tank and the incubator are both 28 deg.

Here are some action shots.

Here is a photograph of a net full of eggs, newly hatched fry with egg sacs still attached and free swimming babies.

fry41

In this image you can clearly see the little Tilapia with their egg sacs. This will provide the little fellows with enough food for a couple of days.

frywitheggsac

Another image. They photograph well against a white background with a macro lens setting.

fry1

And here they are safely in their new home for the next 2 – 3 weeks.

fry2

I now have a good system going and will move the fish between various tanks as they grow and then move them out to the farms when they are about 40mm long.

Be Good

Synaptoman

About these ads

3 Responses

  1. Just looking at your photos of the baby tilapia make me want to quickly drop everything that I am doing and start my own commercial facility.

    I wonder how big the tilapia are now?

  2. Excellent results, I am starting a Tilapia Aquaponic system in Elgin Scotland, heating by biomass and producing watercress basil tomatoes and lettuce in polytunnels. Overseen by Stirling University with an EFF grant, exciting times!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 166 other followers

%d bloggers like this: